Stormfront

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Logotipo do Stormfront, com uma cruz celta cercada pelo lema "white pride, world wide".

Stormfront é um fórum de internet nacionalista branco,[1] supremacista branco[2] e neo-nazista[3] que foi o primeiro grande site de ódio racial da internet. [4]

Stormfront começou como um bulletin board system on-line no início de 1990, antes de ser estabelecido como um website em 1995 pelo ex-líder da Ku Klux Klan e ativista nacionalista branco Don Black.[5] Recebeu a atenção nacional nos Estados Unidos em 2000 depois de ser apresentado como o tema de um documentário, Hate.com.

Referências[editar | editar código-fonte]

  1. Fontes que consideram o Stormfront como um website nacionalista branco incluem:
    • Dan Keating. "White supremacists booted from Internet", Knight-Ridder Newspapers, 2 de maio de 1995. “'I wasn't surprised,' said Don Black of West Palm Beach, who runs the Stormfront World Wide Web site for white nationalists.”
    • Andrew Backover. "Hate sets up shop on Internet", Denver Post, 8 de novembro de 1999. “Nationally, Stormfront.org, a white nationalist site, is considered the granddaddy of online hatred.”
    • Jean Winegardner. "Is Hate Young and New on the Web?", USC Annenberg's Online Journalism Review, 17 de fevereiro de 1998. “Don Black, 44, a white nationalist since the age of 15, runs a site many would put in the hate speech category. He [is] the founder of Stormfront, a white nationalist Web site.”
    • "Hate and the Internet". Anchor: Ted Koppel. ABC News Nightline. ABC. 13 de janeiro de 1998.
    • Swain, Carol Miller. The New White Nationalism in America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 98 pp. ISBN 0-521-80886-3
  2. Fontes que consideram Stormfront um website de supremacia branca incluem:
  3. Fontes que consideram o Stormfront um website neonazista incluem:
    • Kim, T.K.. (Summer 2005). "Electronic Storm – Stormfront Grows a Thriving Neo-Nazi Community". Intelligence Report (118). Southern Poverty Law Center.
    • Zhou, Y; Reid E, Qinj, Chen H, and Lai G (2008). U.S. Domestic Extremist Groups on the Web: Link and Content Analysis. University of Arizona. "Stormfront.org, a neo-Nazi’s Web site set up in 1995, is considered the first major domestic “hate site” on the World Wide Web because of its depth of content and its presentation style which represented a new period for online right-wing extremism"
    • Eshman, Rob. "Jewish Money", The Jewish Journal, 23 de dezembro de 2008. “Earlier this week, when I entered the search terms "Madoff" and "Jewish" into Google, the top responses included JewishJournal.com and stormfront.org, a neo-Nazi Web site.”
    • Hildebrand, Joe. "RSL slams Australia Day hijack", The Daily Telegraph, News Corporation, 1 de janeiro de 2008. “Much of the activity has been co-ordinated through the neo-Nazi website Stormfront, whose Australian arm is moderated by 18-year-old Newcastle resident Rhys McLean.”
    • Ezra Levant, Mark Steyn. Shakedown: How Our Government Is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights. McClelland & Stewart, 2009, ISBN 978-0-7710-4619-3, p. 208. "A particularly rough stretch of road is a neo-Nazi website called Stormfront.org."
    • Jeffrey Kaplan, Heléne Lööw. The Cultic Milieu: Oppositional Subcultures in an Age of Globalization. Rowman Altamira, 2002, ISBN 978-0-7591-0204-0, p. 224. "Also, Web Pages such as ...'Stormfront'... in addition to racist, anti-Semitic, and neo-Nazi messages and illustrations, provide links..."
    • James Friedman. Reality Squared: Televisual Discourse on the Real. Rutgers University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-8135-2989-9, p. 163. "Stormfront provides its viewers with... a general store stocked with Ku Klux Klan (KKK) and neo-Nazi literature and music..."
    • Peter Katel, "Hate Groups: Is Extremism on the Rise in the United States?", in CQ Researcher (ed.). Issues in Terrorism and Homeland Security, SAGE, 2010, ISBN 978-1-4129-9201-5, p. 79. "...a March 13 Web post by Poplawski to the neo-Nazi Web site Stormfront."
    • Zev Garber. Mel Gibson's Passion: The Film, the Controversy, and its Implications. Purdue University Press, 2006, ISBN 978-1-55753-405-7, p. 147. "...Internet websites (e.g. Angry White Female web-page, Vanguard News Network, Christian Identity website, Stormfront Neo-Nazi website, National Alliance website...)"
    • Mark Crispin Miller. Fooled Again: The Real Case for Electoral Reform. Basic Books, 2007, ISBN 978-0-465-04580-8 p. 461. "...appearing on such ultra-rightist websites as Free Republic and the neo-Nazi outfit Stormfront (“WHITE PRIDE WORLD WIDE”)."
    • Markos Moulitsas. American Taliban: How War, Sex, Sin, and Power Bind Jihadists and the Radical Right, Polipoint Press, 2010, ISBN 978-1-936227-02-0 P. 56. "Poplawski was active on white supremacist and neo-Nazi Stormfront internet forums."
    • Andrew Martin, Patrice Petro. Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the "War on terror". Rutgers University Press, 2006, ISBN 978-0-8135-3830-3, p. 174. "...9/11 Internet chat-room discussions, including radical hate-group sites like the neo-Nazi Stormfront.org."
    • John Gorenfeld, Barry W. Lynn. Bad Moon Rising: How Reverend Moon Created the Washington Times, Seduced the Religious Right, and Built an American Kingdom, Polipoint Press, 2008, ISBN 978-0-9794822-3-6, p. 68. "She has even written in to neo-Nazi Web site Stormfront, geeking out together on Peter Jackson's film adaptation;..."
  4. Sources which identify Stormfront as the Internet's "first hate site" include:
  5. Paul Disowns Extremists’ Views but Doesn’t Disavow the Support. The New York Times (25 de dezembro de 2011).

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